What to Make of Stats

The importance of having clear objectives and outcomes for a content strategy is re-iterated when deciding what to track when using various social media as channels for said content strategy. Stated as, “If you know where you’re headed, you’ll know what to track,” the idea that developing a clear vision for one’s business or  professional growth is a vital first step.

Many articles or blogs discussing using Google analytics and Twitter analytics are directed at content creators working for a business, looking for profit, be it small or large. On the other hand, the same things are necessary for an individual who uses the same channels that can by dissected with Google analytics and so on.

I imagine a person who needs to have a strong social media presence using Google analytics, and determining which stats would matter to them. In theory, a person trying to become more well known or employable wants the same things that a business entity would, but in a different way. The process is more direct; the person the content creator reports to is the person that the content is about, or related to somehow.

Jumping from a person trying to become well known to those who are social media celebrities:

How does an influential person on the internet, who is in some way or another a social media personality, maintain their status? How do they choose what to track? What’s the purpose of what they do?

From President Barack Obama to Taylor Swift to Ta-Nehisi Coates, and even to Pinterest queen Joy Cho – these people are influential people on the internet, and have social media accounts to handle, and what they say and do matters, and by extension, affects change to some degree.

So how do they look at their stats and their analytics and what does it mean to them? (Likely, they don’t handle it all by themselves, but let’s say the above question is for their PR team.)

Likely these four factors matter to them significantly:

  • Conversation
  • Amplification
  • Applause
  • Economic Value

Who is talking about their stuff, who’s sharing it, who’s promoting it, and who’s sending in money (maybe).